We were recently visited by Bill and Sandy Lange, proud owners of a Glasair II-S. The Langes were on the back half of a cross-country motor tour heading east. When they found themselves near Glasair Central, they couldn’t help but stop to see where all the fun began.

The Langes worked off and on 10 years building their II-S. Neither were pilots when the project began, but they remedied that early on in the build and had hundreds of hours under their belts by the time the plane was deemed airworthy. After 10 hours in-kind training, Sandy successfully made the leap from a 172 into her own Glasair and hasn’t looked back. Fact is, she can’t say enough about how much she enjoys the plane and thinks of the company.

So much so Bill and Sandy jumped on the opportunity to pick up a partially built GlaStar. It’s still partially built, but Bill says it’s close to being done. We’ve no doubt it’ll see air time soon. And then they can argue over who flies which airplane. Both offer great flying experiences, just in different ways. All good.

The Langes are frequent fliers up and down the East Coast. The Carolinas are favored destinations, but they’ll point their Glasair wherever they care to go and waive all that time in check-in and security lines.

The Langes enjoyed their impromptu tour. For Bill a highlight was visiting with founding partner Ted Setzer. Ted, you’ll remember, recently retired; we can’t promise other visitors they’ll be as lucky.

The couple reside in Brandywine, Maryland, but hangar their Glasair II-S across the Chesapeake Bay at KCGE, Cambridge, also in Maryland. Find them in Hangar 16 if you’re nearby and care to drop by for a bit of hangar flying. Visitors welcome, especially those with a love Glasairs.